#1 Todd Dosenberry from Michigan, USA

1. How and why did you go nomadic?

I’ve been an Internet Entrepreneur since 2006 and have had a desire to travel the world for as long.

In my early days, I sold Nintendo Wii’s on eBay. I followed this up by selling American Eagle Outfitters on eBay. I blogged about the Paleo lifestyle for a few years beginning in April 2010. In 2011 I created and began selling a smoothie recipe ebook. It turned into an app in 2011. In 2013 I coordinated and launched 2 ebook bundle sales.

In October 2014 I joined the Buck Books team and coordinated a few Kindle events. I worked with this team for 2 years. Together we launched PaleoDork.com in November 2015.

In June 2016, I took ownership of PaleoDork.com and was again on my own. I re-branded to PaleoEpic in October 2016. PaleoEpic is now my main source of income. I’m also working on other projects that you’ll learn about below.

I departed Chicago on July 3, 2015 with $58K in business credit card debt, $0 in savings and $1000 in my checking account. This is why I lived in SE Asia for 18 out of 20 months. I’ve since inherited a $20K debt liability (so $78K total debt!) but am down to $11K today. I’ll be debt free by August or September of this year. Patience and hustle pays. It also helps that I’m working with a debt settlement company and lived in SE Asia for so long.

I haven’t traveled as most people think of traveling. I’ve been working. And working. And working some more. Yet I would not trade this for anything. Everything in life is temporary. We all live through dozens of stages. I’m in the hustle-to-pay-off-debt stage. By mid August, I’ll be in the travel-to-celebrate stage.

To kick off 2018 I’ll be in the….

I have no fucking idea. ?

I do know, though, or at least believe that, I’ll have a traveler’s mindset for the rest of my life. May atravelingtoad live on forever.

2. What was it like leaving your home country?

Exciting.

I’ll always remember booking my flight from Chicago to Chiang Mai, Thailand. It was 1:00 am on a Saturday night. I told my parents the next day. Surprised and worried, they wondered why. Why would I want to live in Thailand for 3 months? Why would I want to travel the world?

I want to travel because…

Planet Earth is the world’s greatest country.

I’m a family man at heart. I’m blessed and grateful for all the love within my immediate family that includes 3 older siblings. Yea, I’m the baby at 29 years old. Shit, time flies.

I’d love to be at home in the U.S. close to my family. At the same time, I love traveling. I love meeting new people from around the world. I love experiencing new cultures. I love experiencing nature’s beauty in a variety of places. I love working on entrepreneurial pursuits. I love challenging myself and travel is an automatic challenge. There is a lot I love.

For now, I’m traveling. At some point, I’ll be traveling less. I don’t know if that’s 3 months from now or 3 decades from now. I prefer to meditate with the current.

3. What are your biggest struggles? Fears?

Exciting.

I’ll always remember booking my flight from Chicago to Chiang Mai, Thailand. It was 1:00 am on a Saturday night. I told my parents the next day. Surprised and worried, they wondered why. Why would I want to live in Thailand for 3 months? Why would I want to travel the world?

I want to travel because…

Planet Earth is the world’s greatest country.

I’m a family man at heart. I’m blessed and grateful for all the love within my immediate family that includes 3 older siblings. Yea, I’m the baby at 29 years old. Shit, time flies.

I’d love to be at home in the U.S. close to my family. At the same time, I love traveling. I love meeting new people from around the world. I love experiencing new cultures. I love experiencing nature’s beauty in a variety of places. I love working on entrepreneurial pursuits. I love challenging myself and travel is an automatic challenge. There is a lot I love.

For now, I’m traveling. At some point, I’ll be traveling less. I don’t know if that’s 3 months from now or 3 decades from now. I prefer to meditate with the current.

4. How are you funding your lifestyle and what projects are you working on?

Today, I spend most of my time and earn 99% of my income from PaleoEpic.com. It launched as PaleoDork.com in November 2015. In February 2016 we launched a Free Bundle that contained 81 digital resources. The value was over $1000. All contributors promoted it resulting in a net gain of 68K email subscribers in 12 days.

At launch, all we had was the email list that we sent promotions to 3 days per week. We had big plans for the brand but none of them ever came to fruition. I took ownership in June 2016 and re-branded to PaleoEpic in September 2016.

In October of 2016, I began launching giveaways. We now launch 3 giveaways per week. I enjoy partnering with brands in a fun and engaging way to help increase brands awareness. These giveaways are only step one.

Compare.PaleoEpic.com is a side project that I launched with a friend I met in Chiang Mai. He programmed it from scratch. It’s a product price comparison site for foods. If it goes well, it’ll become it’s own thing and go beyond Paleo.

DollarBooks.net is another side project that will be launching in June 2017. The domain says it all… right?

Nomad Profiles (this very website) is my smallest side as I have no immediate plans to monetize it.

ToadWrites.com is where I published about 70 posts in 70 days. It’s been a long time since I’ve published a post but can’t wait to share more of my story. We all have stories to share.

5. What is the estimated monthly cost of living for one of your favorite locations? What lifestyle does that afford?

For 13 of the 20 months from July 2015 to February 2017 I lived in Chiang Mai, Thailand. For the first 3 months I lived for around $931 per month. For the final 8 months I lived for around $1154 per month. My lifestyle is the same. The major difference is my rent.

First 3 months cost of living in USD:

  • $160 Rent
  • $80 Electricity and water
  • $17 Internet
  • $24 12GB of AIS 3G cell data
  • $650 Food, transportation, coffee, alcohol, etc.

Final 8 months cost of living in USD:

  • $405 Rent – includes fast 50 mbps download speed internet, gym, swimming pool
  • $25 Electricity and water
  • $24 12GB of AIS 4G LTE cell data
  • $700 Food, transportation, coffee, alcohol, etc.

For a full tour of my $405 apartment at Palm Springs checkout this video:

I live a very minimal lifestyle due to my focus being to pay off my debt. Most of the friends I met in Chiang Mai lived for less than $1000 per month even by engaging in various activities.

My main activity was playing basketball twice per week. It kills 3 birds with one stone: fun, fitness and social time. I also went bowling dozens of times. The cost is $5.22 for 3 games plus sock and shoe rental. Movies are less than $3 every Wednesday at Maya mall. I don’t drink much but when I do I go for wine. I’d enjoy half off wine Wednesday’s at Pern’s that allowed me to get a glass for $2. Mojitos at various bars cost less than $3.

Chiang Mai is inexpensive and easy to settle into for a month, 3 months, a year, or longer. It has a great nomad community and there are also a lot of retirees. It’s as safe as a city can be, too.

6. What is your top tip for someone who aspires to earn money online and travel?

One tip? Nah, how about 5? My final thoughts have some good advice, too.

Sign-up for a Schwab investor checking account before you leave if you are from the US. They refund 100% of your ATM fees worldwide. I saved $348 in the first 10 months of using it. They don’t charge fees when you use your card to buy shit and the exchange rate is NOT inflated in their favor.

Travel with as little as possible. I departed the US with this Tortuga backpack. It’s the largest allowed carry-on size worldwide.

Consider buying the Apex Laptop Stand to avoid damaging your neck. I love it and have been using it for more than one year. I’ve seen dozens of people using the Roost Laptop Stand in Chiang Mai so go for that if you think it’s better. The Roost is more compact but the Apex is $25 cheaper and I can definitely vouch for it.

I recommend you start your journey in Chiang Mai, Thailand because it’s easy. Get a 2 month tourist visa and then plan to extend for 1 month for a total stay of 3 months. Then explore other locations if you want. Do a visa run to dozens of amazing locations near Thailand and then come back for up to 3 months if you fancy it. I lived in Chiang Mai for 13 months so don’t feel bad for taking your time before exploring other countries.

Be patient. You may want this or that today, but how feasible is getting this or that today? I’ve been wanting to explore more countries but haven’t. Why? I care more about paying off my debt. I’m planning to explore the UK, Iceland, Spain and wherever else for 3 months beginning in mid August. It took me 25 months of living and hustling before being able to work part-time for a 3 month period.

Any final thoughts?

First, realize the most hardcore truth of all truths:

You’re going to die.

Then, stop giving a fuck.

Finally, consider this:

Planet Earth is the world’s greatest country.

You are a citizen of the world. Your home is Planet Earth. It may be Mars someday. If you have a desire to explore the beauty that the world has to offer then why not book a flight?

Before booking my flight I had all the fears that you have. I still have them. Traveling isn’t easy but nothing in life worth doing is.

Does this mean you book a flight at this moment without a plan?

NO. Please be practical.

When I booked my flight I was working with a small team and was being paid $3,000 per month. $1200 was for debt every month. This left me with $1800 per month to spend and save.

Work remotely with a team or fly to Chiang Mai (or somewhere else) with $5000+ in savings. You can live an upper class lifestyle for $1200 or less per month. Most of my friends that I met in Chiang Mai lived for $700 to $1000 per month. A few lived for less than $500 per month.

This is your life. How do you wish to spend it?

Todd Dosenberry Travels the Web:
Website | Instagram | Nomad List | GoodReads